Bentworth High School

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Course Descriptions

English

English 9                                                                                                    No. 100

This course examines literary elements of fiction, nonfiction, poetry, drama, and the novel. Through activities and assignments involving reading, writing, speaking, and listening, students will use language in a variety of ways.  Library research skills are introduced and practiced, and a research paper using MLA style is required.

English 10                                                                                                  No. 101

This course provides a more in-depth study of literature, composition, grammatical usage and speech.  The integration of reading writing, listening and speaking is stressed through an overview of communication skills, an emphasis on vocabulary development and a thorough interpretation and analysis of literary works.  The literature includes a minimum of four novels, one play and various nonfiction readings. Students prepare projects and oral presentations throughout the year, and at least one major research paper of five or more pages is required. Students will also complete coursework that provides for career exploration through business visitations.

English 11                                                                                                 No. 102

This course gives students a brief overview of the history and origins of the English language and literature from the Anglo-Saxon Period through the 20th century.  Emphasis is placed on vocabulary development, reading and responding, discussing, analyzing, interpreting, and demonstrating an understanding and appreciation of how literature reflects life. At least one major research paper of five or more pages will be required, and students will prepare at least two oral presentations.

English 12                                                                                                 No. 103

This course leads the students through a review of American literature from colonial times to the modern period.  Several novels are read in addition to the materials in the literature text. Formal and creative writing, listening, speaking and vocabulary development activities are utilized to discuss and to analyze the literature studied.  A major research paper is required.

Honors English 11 (Weighted)                                                                             No. 111

This course is designed to provide advanced preparation for college.  Selections from British and world literature offer students an opportunity to explore cultural values and themes. Students are expected to respond to the reading through journal entries and group discussions.  Students are also expected to write papers which analyze different aspects of each genre.  Speech assignments include parody, persuasive and oral interpretation of literature.

In addition to the above-mentioned curriculum, students in this course participate in a literary competition that is hosted by Duquesne University. For this competition, students are required to purchase and read the six books that are chosen by the competition chairperson. The cost of the books is approximately $30 and can be divided between students. The books are retained by the students.

This class reads literature that is on a more advanced level than the regular English curriculum. As a result, some of the books contain more adult language and themes. Those not wishing to read books that deal with these subjects must exercise their rights as outlined in “Exemption from Instruction” on page iv of this handbook.

Pre-requisite:       Successfully completed English 10 with an “A” or teacher recommendation.

 AP English (Weighted)                                                                               No. 113

AP English is based on a combination of literature and composition studies, following the recommendations of the College Board. Students will engage in careful reading and critical analysis of imaginative literature from various genres, periods, and cultures.  Through extensive reading and discussion, students will deepen their understanding of the ways writers use language to provide both meaning and pleasure for their readers.  In addition, students will learn to assess literature for its artistic merit and social and cultural values. Independent summer readings and journal writing are required; these journals are submitted at the beginning of the school term.

Writing assignments in this course will serve to interpret and evaluate the literature being studied. Although most writing will take the form of expository, analytical, and argumentative essays, creative writing will be explored through journals, reflections, and other forms of free writing. Students will be required to pay for and take the AP Literature and Composition Exam offered by the College Board in May. In addition, students will be required to purchase selected books and participate in the English Festival in May (approximately $30).  Currently, the AP exam fee is $86; financial aid is available for students demonstrating need.  Taking the AP exam is one of the requirements to receive credit for this course.

This class reads literature that is on a more advanced level than the regular English curriculum. As a result, some of the books contain more adult language and themes. Those not wishing to read books that deal with these subjects must exercise their right as outlined in “Exemption from Instruction” on page iv of this handbook.

Prerequisite: Honors English 11 with at least a 93% or a teacher recommendation.

College Composition                                  Elective                                    No. 104

This course reinforces previously learned composition skills and focuses on the writing of the essay.  Writing is presented as a process within a workshop setting where the student interacts with peers through conferencing and editing sessions. The students prepare and submit a research paper for evaluation.

Pre-requisite:             Successfully completed English 10 with a "C" or better.

Public Speaking                                         Elective                                    No. 105  

The emphasis of this course is to familiarize students with speech skills needed for improving communication in today’s society.  Exercises include orientation speeches (pantomime, to inform, to convince, impromptu, courtesy speeches, commemorative speeches, special events speeches, oral reading, small group communication, and debates).  The goal is for the student to develop a feeling of self-adequacy and greater ease in expressing his/her thoughts and feelings effectively and understandably.  Participation in a school newscast is also part of the class.  (11-12 grade elective)

Journalism                                                  Elective                                     No. 106

The journalism elective course is an advanced writing class designed to help students write newspaper and feature articles of publishable quality.  Students review and reinforce basic grammar and sentence writing skills, perfect their use of the multi-paragraphed essay or story, and organize their information into accurate and relevant news stories.  Students learn to discern the appropriateness of news.  An overview of press freedom, libel laws, and history of the press in America is included. Guest speakers from the field of journalism are invited to speak to the class.

Performing Arts I                                       Elective                                    No. 107

This course is designed to include the development of the student's skills in oral interpretations and characterizations.  The students have experiences in awareness, concentration, imagination, and interaction with others.  A brief overview of stage movements, costuming, and make up is presented.  All students are required to take part in some aspect of a musical production for the school year.

Social Studies

Grade 9 - Global Studies                                                                                      No. 200

Global Studies is a required course for all ninth grade students.  This course enables the student to gain a global perspective of the growing interdependence of the world community both culturally and economically.  The student learns that human beings interact with the physical and cultural environment in both beneficial and harmful ways.  Regional studies focus on providing historical overviews and an awareness of physical and political boundaries, national governments and economies, and cultural characteristics.  

Grade 10 - U.S. History                                                                              No. 201

The course is a chronological study of the United States from 1900 to the present.  Students discuss and summarize historical events to make decisions about the present and future, to develop an attitude toward effective and responsive citizenship, to understand the struggles of Americans in their search for a better lifestyle during the 20th century, and to appreciate how changes in technology have affected the course of history. A variety of instructional approaches are utilized in this course.

Grade 11- Government and Survey of Economics                                               No. 203

This course concentrates on the skills needed for informed citizenry in the United States.  One semester focuses on economics, and the other focuses on government.  Students examine economic topics, terms, and concepts with an emphasis on practical applications.  In the government section, students discuss the constitutional foundations of government and the rights and responsibilities of individual citizens.

Sociology                                                    Elective                                    No. 207

Sociology concentrates on the development of man in a social environment and the forces that shape man physically, culturally, and mentally.  Students examine how people interact with one another in society and the consequences of this interaction.  A variety of materials are u sed including current events and personal experiences.  Students participate in class and panel discussions, group work, group surveys, projects, and demonstrations.

Pre-Requisite:            Successfully completed 9th and 10th grade social studies courses with a "C" or better.

Psychology Elective                                                                                    No. 208

Psychology is the study of the behavior of living organisms.  The different aspects of man are examined, including the development of personality, memory, learning, stress management, emotional disorders, and sleep/dream characteristics.  Various instructional strategies are used including class discussions, group work, visual interpretations, role playing, demonstrations, and presentations.

Pre-Requisite: Successfully completed 9th and 10th grade social studies courses with a "C" or better.

AP U.S. History (Weighted)                        Elective                                  No. 210

This course can help prepare students who wish to continue their studies education after high school, as well as students who wish to perform exceptionally well on the SAT exam. The level of aptitude in this subject will assist students wishing to excel on the SAT nad in college courses. An emphasis is placed on interpreting documents, mastering a significant body of factual information and writing critical essays.

According to the College Board’s website, AP U.S. History is designed to provide students with the analytical skills and factual knowledge necessary to deal critically with the problems and materials in U.S. history. It should prepare students for entry level and intermediate level history courses on the college level. The AP U.S. History course will include extensive readings of textbooks and case studies as well as in-depth analysis of historical materials. The AP U.S. History course will hone the development of the skills necessary from extensive reading, research, and analysis allowing students to arrive at conclusions based on informed judgment and to present reasons and evidence clearly and persuasively detailing historical events.

It is a requirement of the course that students take the associated AP Exam for this course at their own cost.

Pre-requisite: "B" average or above in previous social studies courses and course teacher approval.  

Science

Biology I                                                                                                    No. 303

In Biology I, students will explore the five major Kingdoms with an emphasis on Kingdoms Plantae and Animalia.  Students will focus on individual organisms, as well as their ecological significance.  The course will also include instructional units on cellular/molecular biology, biochemistry and genetic applications.  As interactive laboratory sessions are integrated into instruction, students will complete the course with a thorough grasp of content, as well as a working knowledge of biological lab skills and procedures.

Biology II                                                                                                   No. 304

Biology II is designed for the student with an interest in a lab science course in life sciences to prepare him/her for post-secondary education. Areas of study concentrate on human biology that includes:  cells, genetics, embryology, microbiology, the body’s immune system, and other systems of the human body. Lab activities are utilized to explore various concepts.  This class is scheduled for five periods a week plus two additional periods of lab.

Pre-requisite:       Successfully completed Biology with a “C” or better.

AP Biology (Weighted)                                                                              No. 314

This course is equivalent to a two-semester college course, usually scheduled by biology majors.  It differs from high school biology in its range and depth of topics and labs.  The three major areas of study are molecules & cells, heredity and evolution and organisms and populations.  Two lab periods per week are included along with a fee to take the AP exam.  Currently, the AP exam fee is $91; financial aid is available for students demonstrating need.  Taking the AP exam is one of the requirements to receive credit for this course.

Pre-requisites: “B” or better in Biology I and Chemistry I. It is strongly recommended that the student have Physics I as a pre-requisite or concurrent course to take AP Biology.

Chemistry I                                                                                                 No. 305

Chemistry I is a physical science course that covers the structure of matter, the periodicity of the elements, principles of atomic structure, balancing equations, stoichiometry and gas laws.  Laboratory work emphasizes the concepts developed in class.  Mathematics is used extensively to express ideas developed in class and laboratory sessions.  Upon the successful completion of this course, the student will be able to solve mathematical problems dealing with chemical concepts, conduct chemical investigations in a laboratory setting, and  recognize safety and procedural requirements to conduct a detailed scientific investigation.  This class is scheduled five periods a week plus two additional periods of lab.

Pre-requisite: Successfully completed Integrated Math I with a ”C” and Biology with a “C” or better.

Chemistry II (Weighted)                                                                              No. 306

Chemistry II deals with specific disciplines of Chemistry.  Areas such as thermodynamics, solutions, reaction rates, chemical equilibrium, acids, bases, salts, oxidation-reduction reactions, electrochemistry, organic chemistry and nuclear chemistry are covered.  Some topics are covered using instrumental labs.  Upon the successful completion of the course, the student will be able to solve mathematical problems dealing with the advanced chemical concepts listed above, conduct chemical investigations in a laboratory setting, and recognize safety and procedural requirements to conduct a detailed scientific investigation.  Instrumental Analysis is a part of the Chemistry II Program.  This class is scheduled five periods a week plus two additional periods of lab.

Pre-requisite:             Successfully completed Integrated Math I and Chemistry I with a “C” or better.

AP Chemistry (Weighted)                                                                                                 No. 311

This course is a college level introductory chemistry course that is scheduled five periods a week plus two additional periods of lab. The student will obtain a thorough understanding of fundamentals and competence in solving chemical problems.  The course covers several of the same topics as Chemistry I and Chemistry II, but does so in more depth, with more reading and problem solving requirements.  The labs will cover many of the same topics covered in typical College laboratories, with the same laboratory notebook and report formats.  Students will be required to pay for and take the AP Chemistry exam offered by the College Board in May.  Currently the AP exam fee is $91.  Financial aid is available for students demonstrating need. Taking the AP exam is one of the requirements to receive credit for this course.

Pre-requisite:             Successfully completed Integrated Math III and Chemistry II with a “B” or better.  Successfully completed Physics I or currently enrolled in Physics I.

Principles of Technology                                                                                      No.307

Principles of Technology is a physical science course designed to prepare students for technical careers.  The complexity and rapid change of modern technology requires training that is applicable to more than a single job.  This Applied Physics course explores the mechanical, fluid, and electrical principles of physics with a hands-on approach.

Pre-requisite:             Successfully completed Algebra Concepts and Applications I or Integrated Math I with a ”C” or better and Algebra Concepts and Applications II or a higher math course.

Physics I                                                                                                     No. 308

Physics I is an introductory physical science course demonstrating the basic concepts of physics and the application of mathematics.  Classical Mechanics (force, momentum, energy) and Wave Mechanics (sound, light, electricity) are explored through various application and lab procedures.  Students compose, analyze, and solve problems in basic classical mechanics and wave mechanics. This class is scheduled for five periods a week plus two additional periods of lab.

Pre-requisite: Currently enrolled in or successfully completed Trigonometry or Advanced Math Concepts

Physics II (Weighted)                                                                                                           No. 316

Physics II is a continuation of Physics I with a higher concentration on Wave Mechanics (sound, light, electricity) and an introduction to Modern Physics (Relativity and Particle Physics).  Creative solutions and lab procedures are stressed.  This course is intended for college bound technical students.
 
Pre-requisite:       Successful completion of Physics I with a “C” or better.

Concepts of Anatomy and Physiology                 Elective                          No.  310

This course is designed as a preparatory course for self-motivated, well-disciplined students pursuing a career in the health/medical field. Students receive a basic foundation of medical terminology and the structural organization of the human body, while emphasis in these areas is placed on how the human body’s systems interrelate to keep balanced and the diseases affecting these systems.  Students will research and report on their chosen health career and analyze case studies on various diseases.

Pre-requisite: Successfully completed Biology I and Health with a “C“ better & 11th grade standing

Physical Science                                                                                                   No.  313

Students will understand the connections between the primary Physical Sciences of Physics and Chemistry and Earth Space Science.  The course is intended for the few 10th graders not ready for Chemistry.

Pre-requisite: 10th Grade Standing

Students that wish to take two lab sciences in their sophomore year may defer their selection of Health/PE until their junior or senior year if they are interested in also selecting band or chorus and a foreign language.  The courses recommended to pair together are Chemistry I and Biology II.  Students must take a science course in three of the four years of their high school experience to graduate.  

Mathematics

Algebra I                                                                                                     No. 401

Algebra I is the course onto which all other math courses are built.  The purpose of this level is to prepare students for success by helping them develop their abilities to set up and solve mathematical problems, think critically, work cooperatively with others, and communicate ideas clearly and succinctly.  Algebraic expressions and linear equations are the main focus of the course since these are the basic concepts that are used throughout all levels of mathematics.  The course also introduces with higher order thinking through polynomials, systems of equations, and functions (radical, exponential, and rational). Some connections to other disciplines such as geometry and statistics further emphasize the purpose and benefits of understanding mathematics.  Student participation is assessed through class work, homework, and projects.  Scientific calculators required.

Pre-requisite:       Successfully completed Pre - Algebra with a "C" or better

Algebra II                                                                                                   No. 402

Algebra II is the second course of the Algebra sequence.  While the strands of Algebra I and Geometry are still present at this level, the main areas of focus are functions which can be used in higher levels of mathematics.  Types of functions discussed include radical, piecewise, exponential, logarithmic, inverse, and trigonometric.  Other topics include but are not limited to:  Linear Relations, Quadratic, Polynomial Functions, Discrete Mathematics, Probability and Statistics.  Student participation is assessed through class work, homework, and projects.  Graphing calculators are required.

Pre-requisite:  Successfully completed Algebra I and / or Geometry with a “C” or better, depending on grade level

Geometry                                                                                                    No. 403

This Geometry course is an extension of Algebra I, and is designed to engage students by learning abstractly in a geometric landscape. Throughout this course algebra concepts are incorporated as geometric concepts are learned.  In addition, this course offers many examples of how geometry is used in the real world.  Topics include but are not limited to:  Reasoning in geometry and Proof, Parallel and Perpendicular Lines, Congruence in Triangles and Quadrilaterals, Proportions and Similarity, Right Triangles and Trigonometry, Transformations and Symmetry, Measurement, Circle Concepts, Areas, Surface Area and Volume.  Graphing calculators are required.

Pre-requisite:  Successfully completed Algebra I with a “C” or better.

Algebra Concepts and Applications IA                                                      No. 411

Algebra Concepts and Applications 1A is the first course of a two-year course sequence, which provides the fundamental concepts and processes of Algebra I.  This course is designed to facilitate learning algebra concepts by helping students gain a practical understanding at an appropriate pace and applying it to the real world.  Throughout this course arithmetic and geometry concepts are incorporated as algebra is learned.  In addition, this course offers many examples of how mathematics is used in various types of careers.  Topics include but are not limited to:  The language of algebra, integers, solving equations, proportional reasoning, probability, functions and graphs, linear equations, powers and roots.  Upon completion of 1A and 1B, students will have completed the Algebra I curriculum.

Pre-requisite:  Successfully completed Pre-Algebra with a “C” or better

Algebra Concepts and Applications IB                                                      No. 412

Algebra Concepts and Applications 1B is the second course of a two-year course sequence, which provides the fundamental concepts and processes of Algebra I.  This course is designed to facilitate learning algebra concepts by helping students gain a practical understanding at an appropriate pace and applying it to the real world.  Throughout this course arithmetic and geometry concepts are incorporated as algebra is learned.  In addition, this course offers many examples of how mathematics is used in various types of careers.  Topics include but are not limited to:  Powers and roots, polynomials, factoring, quadratic and exponential functions, inequalities, systems of equations and inequalities, radical expressions, rational expressions and equations.  Upon completion of 1A and 1B, students will have completed the Algebra I curriculum.
 
Pre-requisite:  Successfully completed Algebra Concepts and Applications 1A with a “C” or better

Geometry Concepts and Applications                                                                 No. 413

Geometry Concepts and Applications is an extension of Algebra Concepts 1A and 1B and is designed to facilitate learning geometry concepts by helping students gain  a practical understanding at an appropriate pace and applying it to the real world.  Throughout this course algebra concepts are incorporated as geometry is learned.  In addition, this course offers many examples of how geometry is used in various types of careers.  Topics include but are not limited to:  Reasoning in geometry, segment measure and coordinate graphing, angles, relationships of parallel and perpendicular lines, triangles and congruence, triangle inequalities, quadrilaterals, proportions and similarity, properties of polygons and area, circles, surface area and volume, right triangles and trigonometry, formalizing proof, transformations.

Pre-requisite:  Successfully completed Algebra Concepts and Applications 1B with a “C” or better
 
Trigonometry/Advanced Mathematics                                                                No. 407

Trigonometry/Advanced mathematics includes a study of the major topics in plane trigonometry. These topics utilize other areas of mathematics and science such as algebra, geometry, and physics. Other mathematical concepts explored include quadratic functions, determinants, logarithms, conic sections, probability, and statistics.

Pre-requisite: Successfully completed Geometry Concepts and Applications with a “B” or better.

Successfully completed Integrated Math III with a “C” or better.

AP Calculus with Analytic Geometry (Weighted)                                                No. 409

AP Calculus is an advanced-level, demanding and fast-paced mathematics course.  Topics include equations of lines, conic section curves, elementary functions, limits and continuity, derivatives of elementary, trigonometric and exponential functions, applications of the derivative including graphing and problem solving, the anti-derivative, the definite and indefinite integral including applications and methods on integration. 
 
It is strongly recommended that students have a TI-83 or similar graphing calculator, since the course requires its use for analyzing and predicting throughout the course.  Daily assignments may require a minimum of 45 minutes of study, review and homework time outside of class.  Grades are based on performance on tests, quizzes, assignments and classwork.

This course includes a fee for the AP exam.  Currently, the AP exam fee is $91; financial aid is available for students demonstrating need.  Taking the AP exam is one of the requirements to receive credit for this course.

Prerequisite:    Successfully completed Trigonometry with a “B” or better.

                        Successfully completed Advanced Math Concepts with a “B” or better

 Calculus (Weighted)                                                                                   No. 410

 

Calculus is a course that would be beneficial for students who are planning on going into a non-science major in college and/or seeking a challenging academic course beyond trigonometry/advanced math.  The material will begin with a review of algebraic and trigonometric concepts. Calculus topics will include: limits, continuity, derivatives, anti-derivatives, and methods of integration.  Student participation is assessed through class work, homework, and projects.  The TI-83 calculator will be used throughout the course.  
 
Prerequisites:       Successfully passing Advanced Math Concepts with a “C” or better.

                             Successfully passing Trigonometry with a “C” or better.

Advanced Mathematical Concepts                                                             No. 416

This course targets the students not pursuing a math or science-related major beyond high school, but who recognize the importance of developing and refining the application of mathematical skills and problem-solving.  Students will study real-world applications of mathematical topics and the use of technology to solve such problems.  Strong emphasis will be placed on fundamental concepts, analyzing problems and determining the most appropriate solutions.  Topics include:  linear, polynomial, rational, trigonometric, exponential and logarithmic functions, as well as basic probability and statistics.  The TI-83 graphing calculator will be used throughout the course.
 
Prerequisites:     Successfully passing Geometry Concepts and Applications with a “B” or better.

                           Successfully completed Integrated Math III with a “C” or better

 Probability and Statistics                                     Elective                          No. 417

Probability and Statistics is an introductory, non-calculus based college level course which introduces the student to the major concepts and tools for collecting, analyzing, predicting and drawing conclusions using data.  The focus of the course will be problem-solving.  Topics include the fundamentals of probability theory, representation of data, random variables, distributions, sampling, hypotheses and statistical testing.

The TI-83 graphing calculator will be used throughout the course.

Prerequisites:   Seniors who successfully completed Integrated Math II or Algebra Concepts and Applications II with a “C” or better.                                

Computer Programming Using C++                     Elective                          No. 420

Computer Programming Using C++ enables the student to analyze a process, determine the procedures of a process, diagram the flow of the procedures, translate the diagram into a C++ program, document a program, debug the program, and validate the results of the C++ program. Emphasis focuses on decision statements, repetition, structures, functions, arrays, string manipulations, and object classes. Additional attention is paid to variables, constants, their types, their scope, syntax, and programming.

Pre-requisite:  Successfully completed Integrated Math I or Algebra Concepts and Applications I with a “C” or better.

Computer Programming Using Visual Basic             Elective                          No. 421

Computer Programming Using Visual Basic focuses on the use of objects and events.  Students will apply the knowledge gained in Computer Programming Using C++ to create and implement Windows-style event driven applications. Emphasis focuses on objects such as buttons, text boxes, option buttons, check boxes, and list boxes, their properties, and their methods.  Additional attention is paid to message and input boxes, menus, and form operations.

Pre-requisite:  Successfully completed Computer Programming Using C++ with a “C” or better.

AP Computer Science A                                                 Elective                          No. 422

Computer Science A will implement object-oriented programming throughout the course with an emphasis on problem solving. The class will meet five periods each week for the entire year. Computer Science A covers the following topics: object-oriented program design, program implementation, program analysis, standard data structures, standard operations and algorithms, and computing in context. This course will use the Java programming language. The students will be completing written assignments as well as programming projects throughout this course. These projects will be applying the Computer Science A concepts and problem solving to help illustrate how programming can assist people in using computers to address real-world problems. This course serves to prepare the students for the AP Computer Science A Exam in May.

It is a requirement of the course that students take the associated A.P. Exam for this course at their own cost.

Pre-requisite:  “B” average or above in previous computer courses and course teacher approval.

Problem-Solving: When Are We Ever Gonna Use This          Elective                           No. 426

Did you ever wonder when you would ever use some of the mathematics you’ve been taught?  This course is designed to teach the application of mathematics to real-world situations.  Students will use critical thinking skills to solve problems within a problem-based and cooperative learning environment, mathematical concepts will be taught in the context of real and compelling applications from the fields of business, medicine, industry, technology and the military.

Prerequisite:  Juniors or Senior who have successfully completed Algebra Concepts and Applications II or Integrated Math II or Integrated Math III with a “C” or better.

The selection of math courses for students will be guided by the members of the math department and their assessment of each of their students. There are a number of options available.  The teachers, counselors and administration are prepared to guide and support each student in their selection of their math courses for their high school experience.  Parents are encouraged to schedule meetings to discuss the direction of their child’s math program.  

Foreign Languages

Spanish I                                                              Elective                           No. 500

This course is designed to introduce the student to the various cultures of the Spanish speaking world.  It provides basic everyday vocabulary and conversational situations.  Students are taught to use Spanish in complete and structurally correct situations and usage. 

Spanish II                                                             Elective                           No. 501

This course reviews the basic elements of Spanish I, then expands the vocabulary and patterns of grammar to a more complex level.  Conversation skills are emphasized.  The student writes guided compositions and selected short readings in Spanish.  A greater understanding of the foreign culture is achieved through research, reading, computer exercises, and oral reports.

Pre-requisite:       Successfully completed Spanish I with a "C" or better.
 
Spanish III                                                            Elective                           No. 502

This course provides a presentation of the subjunctive tense and a review of grammar points.  The phonetic structure of Spanish pronunciation is reviewed with emphasis on oral practice.  Vocabulary geared to common everyday situations is mastered in the form of basic conversation and structured composition.  Free-lance composition writing is targeted to the student's interests.  Selected short stories are read in Spanish to enhance reading proficiency.

Pre-requisite:       Successfully Completed Spanish II with a "C" or better.

Spanish IV                                                           Elective                           No. 503

Spanish IV continues the sequence of reading, writing, listening, and speaking.  More emphasis is placed on using the skills learned as a means of communication.  All levels of grammar and vocabulary are increased with an emphasis on verb tenses and their uses.  A variety of outside readings, reports, and skits are assigned to accommodate individual skill levels.  A strong emphasis is placed on reading for meaning and content in preparation for college and advanced placement testing.

Pre-requisite:       Successfully completed Spanish III with a "C" or better.

French I                                                                Elective                           No. 504

Students are introduced to the four basic language skills of reading, writing, speaking, and listening using a systematic aural/oral approach. Students learn to develop a reflexive response and practice pronunciation through intensive classroom drill.  Emphasis is placed on acquisition of basic vocabulary and grammar patterns.

French II                                                               Elective                           No. 505

This course continues the elements of reading, writing, listening, and speaking at a more complex level.  Vocabulary is increased, patterns of grammar are more intense, and verb study is more detailed.  Writing is introduced in the form of guided compositions.  Cultural study is continued, and reading is introduced through selected short passages.
 
Pre-requisite:       Successfully completed French 1 with a "C" or better.

French III                                                              Elective                           No. 506

French III continues the four elements of language instruction in a much more intensive fashion.  The course is predominately taught in the target language, and students are expected to communicate with each other in French.  A strong emphasis is placed on creative writing and more advanced readings; verbal and grammatical structures are increased.

Pre-requisite:       Successfully completed French II with a "C" or better.

French IV                                                             Elective                           No. 507

French IV continues the four elements of language instruction at a higher level.  The course is predominately taught in the target language and students are expected to communicate with each other in French.  Much emphasis is placed on creative writing and more advanced readings with increased verbal and grammatical structures. Students are exposed to a variety of authentic French literature and a chronology of French history.

Pre-requisite:       Successfully completed French III with a "C" or better.

Music Department

Band Elective                                                                                              No. 600

The Bentworth Marching and Concert Bands promote public relations to outside communities.  Members enhance the school with color, esprit de corps, pride, and recognition.  Participation in afterschool activities is required and assessed as part of the course grade.

Music Theory/Appreciation I                               Elective                           No. 602

This course is a course for students interested in learning how music is written, performed, and recorded.  Students gain an appreciation of the historical significance of music and the ways it is used in society today, as well as receiving instruction in reading, writing, and performing music.

Marching Band Auxiliary                                              Elective (0.25 credits)     No. 605

The auxiliary consists of the Silk Line, Dance Line, and Honor Guard.  Each section performs during football games and other band performances. Performances include dancing and equipment work. Participation in after school activities is required and assessed as part of the course grade.  This course is being offered on a pass/fail basis.

Students will be expected to perform independently and within an ensemble using various textures and styles of the voice.  Students will identify note names and values, recite rhythmic patterns, and perform sight singing exercises in movable “DO” to display musical literacy (Students will be assessed individually.)  Students will complete written critiques and reflections of their vocal performances in concert and will identify and use the comprehensive vocabulary of music, specifically vocal music.  Students will be exposed to and perform vocal music of various styles and time periods.  Participation in after school activities is required and assessed as part of the course grade.

Business Technologies

Computer Applications                                                  (0.5 credit)                    No. 700

Business and industry integrates and requires employees to use tools that facilitate communication, such as keyboarding, the Internet, and software applications.  To function effectively in today’s high tech society, students need basic skills using software applications.  This one semester course combines the learning of word processing, Internet, and other critical software applications, PowerPoint and Excel giving you the skills needed for survival in today’s workplace.  Major projects include a hands-on approach to integrating word processing, spreadsheets, and presentation documents.  

Advanced Word Processing/Desktop Publishing    Elective                       No. 701

A high percentage of people in all walks of life employ a computer keyboard to simplify and speed up their work.  Advanced Word Processing will provide an opportunity to develop a skill that has many wide-ranging uses.  No matter what your career goal is word processing is one of the most useful skills you can learn.  This course will mostly use the advanced functions of your software.  These include but are not limited to creating data files, merging files, designing forms, inserting graphical elements, performing desktop publishing tasks, and calculating data.  In addition, you will have an opportunity to prepare an employment portfolio of your work. 

Pre-requisite:  Successfully completed Computer Applications

Accounting I                                                         Elective                           No. 703

Accounting I develops a realization of the value, use, and necessity of maintaining accurate records as a guide to intelligent personal and business management.  Students learn the double-entry system of accounting using a multi-column approach.  Automated Accounting software will be used to enable students to learn how computers are used for accounting applications with today’s powerful computer systems.  This course is essential for students planning on majoring in business in college or for students who plan to set up a professional practice in an entrepreneurial business.

Pre-requisite:  Students in grades 10-12 who have successfully completed a high school mathematics course with a “C” or better.

Accounting II                                                       Elective                           No. 704

Accounting II is strongly recommended for students who plan to study business management and administration as a career choice.  Emphasis is placed on the partnership and corporate form of the business enterprise.  Topics covered include depreciation, bad debts, cost accounting, uncollectible accounts, accrued revenues and expenses, notes and interest, and distribution of dividends.  Automated Accounting will play a major part in learning how computers are used for accounting applications.  Income tax preparation using software applications and Peachtree® software are introduced. 

Pre-requisite:  Successfully completed Accounting I with a “C” or better.

Web Page Design I                                                Elective (Full yr.)           No. 707

Building a Web site is as easy as dragging and dropping.  Students will gain an overall understanding of the history of the Internet and World Wide Web, HTML code, and designing, setting up, hosting, and maintaining a Web site.  Students will create Web pages incorporating links and images, utilizing tables and forms and data validation.  Macromedia Dreamweaver, the most current software to build Web sites, will be used to develop the Web pages.

Pre-requisite:  Successfully completed Computer Applications

Technology Education

Computer Aided Drafting                                    Elective                          No. 801

Computer Aided Drafting offers the student an insight and understanding of the drafting industry and its place in our society.  In this course, students will develop technical drawings for construction, manufacturing, and production using computer technology.  The students will improve their communication and mathematics skills by developing literacy in a technological civilization.  Students interested in pursuing a career in engineering, construction, and architecture should consider this course.  

Pre-requisite:       Technology Exploration

Graphic Communications I                                  Elective                          No. 803

Communication Systems I offers the students an understanding of the ways that humans create, store, and transmit information.  Students experience individualized and group laboratory activities in the combined areas of computer design and layout, screen printing, digital photography, video production, offset printing, and desktop publishing.

Pre-requisite:       Technology Exploration

Graphic Communications II                                 Elective                           No. 804

Communication Systems II offers the student an opportunity to participate in individualized and group laboratory activities in the combined areas of creating, assembling, processing, disseminating, and assimilating of a communicative message. Students develop projects that include the use of materials in the following areas: screen printing, offset printing, digital photography, desktop publishing, video taping/editing, power point presentations and binding techniques.
 
Pre-requisite:  Successfully completed Communication Systems I with a “C” or better and Technology

Exploration

Technology Exploration                                        (0.5 credit)                     No. 807

In this course, students will develop the ability to select and correctly use materials, tools, techniques and processes to answer questions understand explanations and identify and solve problems encountered in real life situations.  Students will design, create, use, evaluate and modify systems of  Biotechnologies, Information Technologies and Physical Technologies. Students will explore the societal impact of the products and processes of new technologies.

Family Consumer Science

Child Development                                                        Elective                           No. 811

Child Development explores the study of the birth and development of children up to six years old.  Students learn various components of parenthood including the preparation for child birth, theories of human development and behavior, child development, child psychology, and child care.  Students complete a series of group activities using major concepts taught in the course.

Independent Living                                               Elective                           No. 812

The Independent Living course develops skills needed to be successful in today’s world.  Areas of study will include: choosing a place to live, renting an apartment, buying a home, housekeeping, decorating your home, clothing care, being a wise consumer, consumer rights and responsibilities, budgeting your money and bank accounts, family living, manners and etiquette.  Students will be introduced to the sewing machine and learn basic machine and hand sewing skills.  Students will produce sewing projects.  Students may be required to provide fabric.  

Foods/Nutrition I                                                 Elective                           No. 814

Foods/Nutrition I provides skills in basic food preparation.  Students discover the value of the food pyramid and its relationship to meal preparation.  Nutritional value, cost benefit analysis of food preparation, basic and advanced food preparation, menu planning, and storage and preservation of foods are explored.  Students design a restaurant and menu for a final product.
 
Pre-requisite: 10th grade standing

Art

General Art                                                           Elective                           No. 816

In General Art, the student is introduced to the basic elements of design, line, shape, value, color, pattern, and form.  Projects and exercises are offered in a wide variety of material and media.  Reading assignments and examinations are given on individual artists and periods of art appropriate to the materials and subject covered in each unit.  

**General Art is a prerequisite for all other art courses so that design skills learned may be transferred to more advanced `                levels.*

Advanced Painting & Theory                               Elective                           No. 817

Advanced Painting and Theory uses painting and drawing media such as watercolor, oils, and pastels.  Long-term projects are assigned following short-term exercises to help the student master the media used and to sharpen drawing skills.  Readings and examples of individual artists and periods of art history are given in relation to the studio assignment.

Two-Dimensional Crafts                                                Elective                           No. 818

Two-Dimensional Crafts focuses on visual communication through print-making, illustration, calligraphy, and poster and package design.  The course draws upon and extends skills learned in General Art in such elements as line, shape, and pattern.

Three-Dimensional Crafts                                    Elective                          No. 819

Three-Dimensional Crafts offers instruction in three-dimensional media such as additive and subtractive sculpture and jewelry making.  Emphasis is on design and structure rather than on practicality.  Project assignments include ceramics and clay sculpture, plaster carving, casting, and metal construction.

Pre-requisite:                         Successfully completed Two-Dimensional Crafts with a "C" or better

Physical Education and Health

                0.25 credits per course

Physical Education 9                                                                                   No. 900

Physical Education 10  

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Physical Education 11                                                                                No. 902

Physical Education 12                                         
          
The aim of physical education is the development of the total individual for adult life.  This includes a conditioning program, physical fitness, individual testing, and games.  It is a carefully planned sequence of learning experiences designed to help students (a) acquire an appreciation of and a respect for good physical condition (fitness), a functional posture, and a sense of personal well being and (b) develop an interest in and a desire to participate in lifetime recreational sports.  A unit on drug, alcohol and tobacco prevention will be included in PE 9, 10, 11 and 12.

Health                                                                   0.5 credit                        No. 907

Health is a state of complete physical, mental, and social well being, not merely the absence of disease or infirmity.  Quality Education should help every student acquire knowledge and develop practices necessary to maintain physical and emotional well being. Contemporary health education curricula are combinations of health promotion and disease prevention.  Through these curricula, students gain a better understanding of the benefits of healthful behaviors, increased knowledge of risks to their health, and enhanced insights into the relationships of behavior to health.

Mon Valley Career & Technology Center

Career and Technical Education

Program of Studies

Important notes:

1.      Students may elect for one, two, or three years of Career and Technical Studies.

2.      Career or program specific mathematics is offered to interested students or students with a schedule conflict.  Credits apply toward graduation requirements at Bentworth High School.

3.      Seniors doing satisfactory work at the CTC and home school may be eligible for a paid work experience during school time related to their field of study.

4.      Mon Valley CTC may explore on-going articulation agreements with post-secondary institutions as opportunities arise. 

Automotive Body Repair                                              No. 950 PM, No. 970 AM

This course affords students the opportunity to learn the skills necessary to rebuild and refinish automotive bodies, repair and replace trim and upholstery, align frames, weld, replace glass and make estimates of repairs costs.  Students develop a basic understanding of automotive body and chassis construction.  They use tools of the trade and learn the maintenance and safety procedures required by the automotive industry.

Options upon graduation:  Employment in trade or trade related occupation, advanced training.

Automotive Mechanic Technology                                          No. 951 PM, No. 971 AM

This course offers the students practical instruction in the diagnosis and repair of all automotive systems and their components.  It is designed to provide instruction in the theory and principles of the automobile engine, electrical circuitry, chassis, clutch, transmission, lubrication systems, electrical controls, and computerized controls.  Students can train to become an inspection mechanic or enter a specialty field such as automatic transmission specialist, and many others.  PA certification in Safety and Emission Inspection is offered.

Options upon graduation: Employment in trade or trade related occupation, advanced training, associate degree.

Carpentry                                                                                No. 952 PM, No. 972 AM

In this course students learn to interpret blueprints, shop drawings, specifications and detailed drawings in order to determine dimensions and materials used in a construction project.  The carpentry students learns to erect, install and repair structures using wood, plywood and wallboard, as well as to estimate and select the specific materials needed for each project. Students learn to lay out projects using the framing square, transit, and various measuring, cutting and assembling instruments.  Students also learn to erect and brace framework, apply interior and exterior finishes and to fit and install prefabricated cabinets, laminated plastic, floor and ceiling tiles, insulation, weather-stripping, finish hardware, and locksets.

Options upon graduation:  Employment in trade or trade related occupation, carpenters union, advanced training, associate degree.

Computer Networking & Maintenance                          No. 953 PM, No. 973 AM

This course will cover computer repair basics and maintenance that will give students the knowledge to get entry level positions in the computer repair industry.  With this training students will understand the basics of computer repair and will be able to incorporate skills that they learned to troubleshoot hardware and software problems.  Students will receive training in network wiring, network configuration and network administration.  They will also learn how to design and implement local and wide area networks.  After this three year course is completed, students will be able to take their certification tests in Comptia A+, Comptia Network+, Cisco Networking and Microsoft Certified Systems Administrator.

Options upon graduation:  Employment in trade or trade related occupation, advanced training, associate degree, and/or baccalaureate degree.

Cosmetology                                                                 No. 954 PM, No. 974 AM

Students selecting this course will learn a variety of skills related to the field of cosmetology.  Training in hairdressing, facial work, skin care, nail care, and scalp management is offered.  Included in the instruction are marketing, management, record keeping, ethics, and good public relations that apply to cosmetology.  Upon completion of 1,250 hours of training, students are eligible to take the PA State Board examination in Cosmetology.

Options upon completion of State Board Examination:  Employment in trade or trade related occupation, advanced training.

*Students are required to purchase a cosmetology kit at MVCTC.  

Metal Fabrication/Welding                                            No. 955 PM, No. 975 AM

This is an instructional program that prepares individuals to apply technical knowledge and skills in a variety of metalworking occupations.  Instruction includes welding and cutting processes; setting up and operating machine tools (Precision machining); metal fabricating, forming and cutting machines; and assembling of metal products and structures.  Instruction is also provided in the use of hand and portable power tools in making computations related to work dimensions, the physical properties of materials and other related instruction and skills associated with metalworking occupations.  Metals are cast, formed shaped, molded, heat-treated, cut, twisted, pressed, fused, stamped or otherwise worked upon.

Culinary Arts                                                                  No. 957 PM, No. 977 AM

This program incorporates classroom with laboratory instruction to introduce students to on the job training as well as to technical education.  The variety of instruction includes cold food preparation, baking, cooking, table service, host/hostess, catering, receiving and storing of goods, restaurant bookkeeping, and shop maintenance.  Safety instruction in the use of food service equipment is emphasized.  The Culinary Arts program is conducted in the school’s fully equipped restaurant and kitchen.  Students learn restaurant and institutional food management skills.

Options upon graduation:  Employment in trade or trade related occupation, advanced training and/or baccalaureate degree.

Electrical Power Technology                                         No. 956 PM, No. 976 AM

This program provides instruction on the installation of the wiring system that provides heat, light, air conditioning, and power to commercial, industrial, and residential facilities.  Students will learn to lay out, assemble, install, and test electrical apparatus and wiring systems.  The course introduces students to robotics and programming.  Hydraulics, pneumatics, security systems, and programmable logic controls will also be taught.  In addition to training as a construction electrician, students will also receive practice as a maintenance electrician, teaching them to keep the equipment they install operating.  Graduates are not only limited to building trade construction but they are also prepared to enter maintenance, and industrial electrical occupations.   Seniors may complete the first year of Apprenticeship with the Associated Builders & Contractors Union.

Options upon graduation:  Employment in trade or trade related occupation, associate degree, and/or baccalaureate degree.

Health Occupations                                                        No. 958 PM, No. 978 AM

The Health Occupations Education Curriculum is a cluster program designed to introduce careers in health care and to permit graduates to pursue post-secondary education.  Basic health occupation instruction introduces field experience in extended classrooms in addition to the core curriculum.  The Health Occupations Core instruction includes planned courses in Health Care Careers, Safety Practices, Anatomy & Physiology, Data Management Technology, Legal & Ethical Issues, Communications, Medical Terminology, Growth & Development, Nutrition, Health Care Systems, Health & Wellness, and Health Care Skills.

Options upon graduation:  Associate degree, and/or baccalaureate degree.

Masonry                                                                          No. 959 PM, No. 979 AM

Students who enter this trade learn the fundamental masonry skills needed to meet industry standards. Students are trained in blueprint reading, layout leveling, plumbing, estimating, and the care and safety of hand and power tools.  Learning is accomplished through a combination of classroom theory and actual hands-on project completion.  Students learn to lay out foundations, mix mortar, construct, repair, and tear down work.  Students work on exterior and interior walls,

floors, patios, arches, fireplaces, walks, columns, and chimneys.  The materials of the trade include brick, tile, glass, stone, marble, and concrete.

Options upon graduation: Employment in trade or trade related occupation, advanced training, associate degree, and/or baccalaureate degree.

Multimedia Design Technology                                       No. 960 PM, No. 980 AM

Students are instructed in the skills used by today’s printing industry.  Multimedia Design is the skill and the art of producing printed products on paper, glass, cloth, metal, or other materials.  Most printed work consists of design artwork, typesetting, camera work, plate making, printing, finishing, binding, silk screening, computer generated graphics and digital photography.  Learning is accomplished through a combination of classroom theory and actual hands-on projects.  Students become familiar with the most efficient and most economical state-of-the-art methods for reproducing materials.  Students learn the safe and correct methods of operations and maintenance of tools and equipment.

Options upon graduation:  Employment in trade or trade related occupation, advanced training, associate degree, and/or baccalaureate degree.

Precision Machining     

Students currently enrolled in Precision Machining will complete their programming in the Metal Fabrication/welding program.  Their course selection should reflect this change.  The appropriate course number is 955.  

Protective Services                                                         No. 962 PM, No. 983 AM

Is an instructional program that prepares individuals to apply technical knowledge and skill to perform duties as a police officer, fire fighter, paramedic, and other safety services.  The program stresses the techniques, methods, and procedures particular to the areas of criminal justice, fire protection, and EMT, especially in emergency disaster situations.  Students also receive training in map reading, vehicle and equipment operation, the judicial system, pre-hospital emergency medical care, disaster operations, various rescue practices and communications. Post-secondary credits are available.

Options upon graduation:  Employment in trade or trade related occupation, advanced training, associated degree, and/or baccalaureate degree.

Gas & Oil Service Technician                                        No. 964 PM, No. 984 AM

Natural-gas drilling supports 300,000 jobs in Pennsylvania. This is a program that prepares individuals to apply technical knowledge and skills to set up, maintain, repair, and operate drilling equipment; locate, drill, construct and develop gas, water and oil wells; and test and monitor wells to ensure adequate flow.  Instruction also includes applications to home, business and industrial uses.  This program is designed to fill the gap between industry and skilled laborers in the gas and oil industry and provide students the opportunity for family sustaining wages with room for advancement.

Computer Programming                                                          No. 966 PM, No. 986 AM

This course provides students with a solid foundation of information technology skills.  Students then advance to the product development cycle including audience analysis and planning, problem solving/logic, coding, testing, and modifying applications.  Students practice this process using a variety of programming languages to create web pages and software applications.  Opportunities for industry certification are provided for Microsoft Office Access and Excel, certified Internet Webmaster (CIW), and Sun JAVA.

Options upon graduation:  Employment in trade or trade related occupation, advanced training, associate degree, and/or baccalaureate degree.

CO-OP  PROGRAM

A student doing satisfactory work at the home school and at the CTC may be eligible for a paid work experience during school time in their field of study.

SkillsUSA-VICA, a co-curricular student organization, offers students leadership skills in cooperation with their career skills.

MON VALLEY CAREER & TECHNOLOGY CENTER

APPLICATION FOR ADMISSION

Name                                                                               SS#            
      
Address                                                                           Phone#                  

                                                                                        Home School                          

HOW TO APPLY:

1.      Choose the class you want to schedule.

If you have more than one class that you are considering, please mark your first choice “1” and your second choice “2”.

 

_____AUTOMOTIVE BODY REPAIR                                _____ELECTRICAL POWER TECHONOLGY

 

_____AUTOMOTIVE MECHANIC TECHNOLOGY        _____CULINARY ARTS

 

_____CARPENTRY                                                              _____MULTIMEDIA DESIGN TECHNOLOGY

 

_____COMPUTER PROGRAMMING                                _____HEALTH OCCUPATIONS

 

_____COMPUTER NETWORK & MAINTENANCE         _____METAL

TECH.                                                                                          FABRICATION/WELDING

           

_____COSMETOLOGY                                                        _____MASONRY

                       

_____ GAS & OIL TECHNICIAN                                       _____PROTECTIVE SERVICES

 

2.                  DISCUSS YOUR CHOICE(S) WITH YOUR PARENTS AND/OR GUARDIANS.

 

3.                  HAVE YOUR PARENT AND/OR GUARDIAN SIGN THIS APPLICATION.

 

4.                  PLEASE SIGN AND RETURN APPLICATION FOR COMPLETION TO YOUR GUIDANCE COUNSELOR AT YOUR HIGH SCHOOL.

 

_________________________________                  _____________________________________

Student Signature                                                       Parent/Guardian Signature



GUIDANCE OFFICE ONLY

Guidance Counselor Signature